Picture of the Google Home smart speaker, front view, with box open.

Connecting Google Home Speaker to Honeywell Smart Thermostats




We bought a Google Home smart speaker with the Google virtual assistant.  However, we found that currently, Google Home does not currently support connect our Honeywell  Total Connect Comfort (TCC)  thermostat.  We checked under the smart home devices option in the Google Home App.  Honeywell is not listed.  Nor is our thermostat found when we scan for smart devices on our home network, even though the thermostat is definitely online, as verified by logging in to our Total Comfort Connect account.

Picture of the Google Home smart speaker, front view, with box open.
Google Home smart speaker, front view, with box open.

Google Home abilities for Honeywell’s collection of IoT devices would be nice, so as to be able to issue voice commands through that intelligent speaker, to control the thermostat, add and modify program schedules, turn furnace blowers on and off, and read out its current status as well as the indoor temperature and humidity readings.

While other smart home controller devices like this one have implemented basic thermostat control options, so far, most of them lack the more advanced features required to fully operate Honeywell thermostats and inspect these readings remotely.  So far, no ability is as of yet available for Honeywell internet thermostats on Google Home.  But we hope that Google will get it right the first time, and create a comprehensive remote thermostat control ability; one that can adjust all Honeywell intelligent thermostat settings and read all current parameters.  Being big fans of Honeywell controllers ourselves, we’ll keep a watchful eye out for this capability, and update this post with more current instructions for using it, once they release the ability(ies) to production.

In the meantime, we’re going to run through how we think setting up this link will work once they do develop it.  You can do a few things to assure your preparedness for this ability once released, and we’ll detail those below.

Since we’ve owned the Honeywell RTH9580WF internet enabled thermostat, pictured next, for a year or so now, we’ve already set up an account at the TCC website.  Thus, we won’t describe how to do that here, as account setup over there is easy to achieve by following the instructions at the TCC web site.  However, such an account will likely be required, as it is for the Amazon Echo Dot for example, in order to control your Honeywell TCC devices via Google Home.  So, you might as well set one up, if you do not have one already.

We also assume that you’ve installed and set up your Google Home smart speaker with the Google Home App on your tablet computer.

Picture of the Honeywell WiFi Smart Thermostat RTH9580WF, home screen view.
Honeywell WiFi Smart Thermostat RTH9580WF, home screen view.

Check for the Honeywell Total Connect Comfort Ability

1. To get started, you’ll need a TCC account.  So, as mentioned above, if you don’t already have one, head on over to the Honeywell portal website here, and create one.  Be sure to save your user Id and password, as you’ll need this information when configuring the Alexa Honeywell TCC skill below.

2. Run the Google Home app on your tablet.  We’re using an iPad Air computer tablet in this scenario.  This app is located on page three of our iPad’s home screen, although yours may appear in a different location, depending on how many apps you have installed as well as how you might have arranged them.

Picture of the Google Home App entry, as shown on the iOS home screen.
Google Home App entry, as shown on the iOS home screen.

Upon running this app, the Google home screen appears, as follows.

Picture of the Google Home App home screen, as displayed when run on iOS devices.
Google Home App home screen, as displayed when run on iOS devices.

3. Scroll down the home screen until you see the   Browse All   link, as shown next.

Picture of the Google Home App, displaying its Home Screen bottom on iOS, with the Browse All link circled.
Google Home App, displaying its Home Screen bottom on iOS, with the Browse All link circled.

4. Tap the Browse All link at the bottom of the Google Home screen, circled in purple in the previous picture.  The What Can You Do? screen then appears.  On that screen, we’ve scrolled down the page until we found the Control The Home entry, as circled in purple.

Picture of the Google Home App on iOS, displaying the What Can You Do screen, with the Control the Home link highlighted.
Google Home App on iOS, displaying the What Can You Do screen, with the Control the Home link highlighted.

5. Tap the Add Device link, as shown in the previous picture.  The Home Control screen then appears, as pictured next.

Picture of the Google Home App on iOS, displaying the Home Control screen, with the Add Device button highlighted.
Google Home App on iOS, displaying the Home Control screen, with the Add Device button highlighted.

6. Tap the + (Plus) button, pointed to by the purple arrow in the previous picture.  You then get the list of available device manufacturers whose smart devices you can add, as shown in the next picture.

Picture of the Google Home App on iOS, displaying the Add Devices screen.
Google Home App on iOS, displaying the Add Devices screen.

We expect that on the above screen, a Honeywell Smart Devices ability will eventually appear.  You would then tap that, and then you’d be prompted for your Honeywell TCC account information and then be given the opportunity to search for active Honeywell smart devices on your home network. That part of the scenario might go something like the following.

Enter Your Total Connect Comfort Account Information

7. Enter the email address and password you created your Honeywell TCC account with, in the spaces provided.

8. Tap the Sign In button.  If you’ve entered the user Id and password for a valid Honeywell TCC account, a EULA page would likely then appear.

9. Tap the  I Accept  button.  You would then get some sort of Connection Established Successfully screen.

10.  Press the Close button.  A screen might then display, showing the lists of smart home abilities you’ve set up, along with the list of smart home devices that Google Home has found and is capable of actuating.

11. You may have to scroll down to find your Honeywell thermostat as follows.

If you see your thermostat listed, then all is finished, and you can no begin speaking commands to Google Home. Some of the commands that might work follow in the next section.

If you do not see your thermostat, try tapping the Discover  devices  link.  Be sure your thermostat is connected to the internet and online.  If discovered, it will then appear in a Your Devices list.

Again, let us remind you that this feature / function is not yet available on the Google Home speaker, but that when they do add it, the ability will likely work similarly to as we describe in this post.

Example Google Home Commands for Controlling Honeywell Thermostats

  • Okay Google, raise thermostat temperature.   Raises thermostat setting by two degrees.
  • Hey Google, lower thermostat temperature.  Lowers thermostat temperature setting by two degrees.
  • Okay Google, set thermostat temperature to 74 degrees.  Sets thermostat temperature to 74 degrees.

Note that the Honeywell TCC skill on Amazon Alexa appears not to currently support questions that ask for status aspects of the thermostats (indoor temperature and humidity, current program settings, status of furnace fan, et al).  We hope that such questions can be asked of Google Home in the initial release of the Honeywell ability, whenever it comes.  Any initial ability offering should be able to respond appropriately to the following questions.

  • Okay Google, what is the indoor temperature?
  • Hey Google, thermostat, what is the outdoor temperature?
  • Hey Google, what is the current thermostat temperature setting?
  • Okay Google, what is the current thermostat indoor humidity? 

We look forward to this Honeywell ability on Google Home, which hopefully, will come very soon, and yet be comprehensive as well. Stay tuned.  We’ll update this post when it arrives.

Related Posts

Suggested Reading

References

Revision History

  • 2016-12-27: Added more links to the Related Posts section.
  • 2016-12-26: Originally published.