Picture of the IXCC Element Series Sync Charge Lightning Cable, 6-Ft, front view of original packaging.

IXCC 6 Foot Lightning Cable Review, MFi Certified

The IXCC 6 foot lightning cable surprises the inexpensive sync and charge cable market.  Given its quality and MFi (Made for iPhone/iPad/iPod) certification, this cord tops expectations.

We paid $7.99 for it at Amazon.com. So, this costs way less than original Apple cords.  The extra couple feet here makes the IXCC 6 foot lightning cable lots cheaper per foot than the Apple stock cables.

Plus, this cable offers a rugged yet portable design.  So, you get a highly reliable way to connect your mobile devices, computers, and chargers. Though not a “Genuine Apple Cable,” the IXCC 6 foot lightning cable functions just as well.  Better, in fact.

Of the USB cables tested, we find that this IXCC 6 foot lightning cable occupies its rightful spot among the best cables we’ve tried.  It’s seems the cheapest in “the best” class. Though it’s longer than the standard four foot lightning cables, charging occurs as fast.  It’s even faster in some cases, due to its higher current handling capability.

Despite the greater current rating, all connections remain cool to the touch in the IXCC 6 foot lightning cable.  Further, the thicker wire still flexes enough to wrap into a compact shape for travel.

Further, our iPad Air fully charges with this cable. We never see the dreaded, “not charging” message; unlike what happens with the cheaper, sometimes counterfeit charge cables.

Picture of the IXCC 6 foot lightning cable, back view of original packaging.
Back view of original packaging.

Advantages, Benefits, and Features of the Element Series IXCC 6 Foot Lightning Cable

Plenty of Length

First, you get extra cord in the IXCC 6 foot lightning cable. That’s almost 2 meters long.  We use the iPad Air in the easychair while charging with this longer cord.

Fast Charging 

The IXCC 6-foot lightning cable here works well in high-amp USB Apple devices (those needing more than one amp). No increase however in full-charge times that we saw. However, often the longer cables slow charging. But that’s not the case here.  E.g. We charged an iPad Air from fifteen percent to thirty-six percent charge in an hour.

Heavy Cable

This cord is thicker than the one that comes with the stock iPad Air tablet. So we forecast longer durability, and so far, have indeed seen that. And, though thicker, the wire is almost as flexible as the original charge cable.  Thus, you get very fast charging from a flexible cable.

The IXCC 6 Foot Lightning Cable Works with Non Stock USB Charger Adapters

Since it has a USB-D port, this 6 foot lightning cable for iPads, iPhones, and iPods works well with most USB chargers.

MFi Certified

IXCC made this cable for any Apple device with the lightning port. E.g.  iPod, iPad 4th Generation and up.  Also, there’s the iPad Air, iPhone 5 and up, and iPad Mini.  Finally, the iPod Touch 5th Generation and up, and iPod Nano 7th Generation and up, all accept lightning cables.

Gold-Plated Contacts 

Both the lightning and USB A plugs sport sure-contact pins for enhanced reliability.

The IXCC 6 Foot Lightning Cable has Improved Plug Design 

We used Apple’s stock lightning cables prior. These featured too-small connector bodies. So at first, we didn’t care for lightning.  Indeed, we preferred the older 30-pin dock connector.   The docking connecter after all was much easier to attach and detach.

But, this IXCC 6 foot lightning cable changed all that.  They have an easier to grab connector. This cable needs about the same small effort as the dock connectors to plug in and out. Further, you can aim them at the mating holes with greater ease than Apple stock cords. Why?  Because of the longer connector body here.  To be sure, this body is shorter than in other cables.  Yet it’s still long enough to grasp easily, even on iPads inside an OtterBox case.

USB 2 and USB 3 Standards Supported

Charge your iOS device from any current or legacy USB adapter with this IXCC 6 foot lightning cable.

Functions On Par with Apple Stock Cables

Meets or exceeds Apple’s hefty standards.

Less Expensive

Less costly a data cable, even an iPhone charger cord. IXCC is overcoming Apple’s hold on licensing fees that third party producers like IXCC must pay.

Picture of the Element series IXCC 6 foot lightning cable, unpacked, with original packaging removed.
Element series cable, unpacked, with the original packaging removed.

Concerns, Cons, and Problems with the Element Series IXCC 6 Foot Lightning Cable

Made in China

Contains Delicate Electronics

Firstly, all lightning cables feature internal circuits that devices  “authenticate” the cable with before they’ll work. This built-in chip increases cable susceptibility to early failure. Thus, cables like this can seem “fragile,” as they often stop working too quickly. As such, treat them like any piece of delicate equipment. Namely, keep them away from static electricity, bright sunlight, wet locations, shock, Etc.

Strain Relief Too Hard

Then too, the strain relief at the lightening plug end is not flexible enough. Built from nearly the same rigid plastic as the plug body, that’s no wonder. So, it’s unclear how much protection this strain relief offers.  In fact, what we think is strain relief sleeves may just be part of the connector body. IXCC may not have intended to provide strain relief. So, reinforced yet flexible strain relief would improve this cable markedly.

Not Full USB Charging Support

Further, this cable does not charge micro-USB phones.  But you can buy a lighting-to-micro-USB adapter for that.  Or, you could get a USB-D to micro USB cable. Those cords cost far less than even this lightning cable.

Only Certain Stores Sell the IXCC 6 Foot Lightning Cable

Amazon and eBay sell these cables. So far though, we’ve not found them elsewhere.  Thus, they can be hard to find if you shop nearby only.

Single Device Charging

Furthermore, this IXCC cable only charges one device at a time. Yet other cables have multiple charge ports. But no biggie if you’re charging just a single Apple device.

Our Rating for the IXCC 6 Foot Lightning Cable

This cable for Apple mobile players goes way past stock Apple cables in terms of quality.   It’s easy to use, yet cheap for a data sync cord.  Indeed, this lightning cable by no means costs too much. We found it for under ten dollars. With the lightening interface so widespread now, cables like this are a great choice.  They offer a cheaper choice than the stock cords. Hopefully, Apple will ease up on its licensing fees for third-party product builders. This would mean that these cables would cost less, yet remain in the upper crust of decent construction.  Given all the pros and cons, we rate this iPhone sync charge cord at 98 out of 100.

Related Posts to the IXCC 6 Foot Lightning Cable

  1. Axcel Lightning Cable for iPhone Review
  2. iEdge USB Cable 6 Feet Cord Length Review
  3. Belkin Lightning USB Cable Charge Sync Cord, 1.2M, 4 Ft Review
  4. DE Lightning Charging Cable Review, 9 Ft, Sync Too
  5. iEdge® Lightning USB Cable Glitter Series E-380 Review
  6. Apple Lightning Cable Replacement by Belkin, Review
  7. iEdge E 330 Cable Review, Lightning Cord, iPhone iPod iPad

Suggested Reading

  1. High Quality Ethernet Cable, How to Pick the Best Ones
  2. RavPower 24w Wall Charger Review, USB, Dual Port
  3. OtterBox Defender Case Review for iPad Air and Mini
  4. Electric Cable Ceiling Heat Pros and Cons
  5. Monster Digital USB Drive 16GB. Flash Drive Review
  6. SanDisk Cruzer Glide 16GB USB Flash Drive Review
  7. Evolution Digital Cable Box Remote Codes
  8. ClassCo InTouch 5000 Talking Caller Id Box Review
  9. 10 Port USB Charging Station Review, Gearmo ICS-10P-HO
  10. JBL Flip 4 Charger Type, Which USB Charger to Use
  11. Monster Digital USB Drive 16GB. Flash Drive Review
  12. How to Change COM Port on USB Modem, Windows 10
  13. JBL Clip 2 Charger, Which USB Charger Replacement

References for the IXCC 6 Foot Lightning Cable

Revision History

  • 2019-07-07: Tweaked the targeting for ‘IXCC 6 Foot Lightning’, removed ad code, and added more links and tags.
  • 2018-03-01: Updated tags list and title.  Added the Related Posts section.
  • 2015-10-21: Added appropriate tags.
  • 2015-10-12: Originally published.